Top Recruitment Sectors for Growth in 2017

It’s here again, our popular annual blog that looks into the future and predicts the recruitment sectors that are geared for high growth in 2017.

2016 has seen some dramatic changes in the World. The UK voting for Brexit and the US voting for Donald Trump have seen a huge shift towards populist voting and a rejection of the establishment and globalisation. With general election in France, Netherlands and Germany in 2017 its difficult to predict what the future will hold.

So against this background this years predictions have been particularly fraught with challenge and some might even say they are courageous.

UK and Global Economic Dynamics

In making our predictions this year we believe it is important to state how we see the UK and World economies behaving as this will temper any forecasts.

As I write this blog the UK is projecting 2.2-2.4% growth in 2016, which is pretty much what was being projected last year. In fact this weeks Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) for the services sector is very robust and there is every likelihood that the UK will top the economic growth league amongst the G7 countries.

No small feat for an economy that everyone was writing off after Brexit.

After a fourth consecutive month of growth most importantly for the Recruitment Sector Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit states:

“Employment is rising at one of the fastest rates seen over the past five years. Employers’ appetite to hire is being whetted by a further accumulation of unfinished work. Backlogs of uncompleted orders showed the largest rise for five-and-a-half years.”

Next year we remain optimistic and expect the UK economy to grow at 1.6-2.0%. Even as we go to press on our blog the economic picture is changing. Only recently the Bank of England upgraded its forecast for the UK to 1.4% and we have still to factor in the “Trump-effect”. Commentators are mixed on this but given his personal heritage with a Scottish mother and significant business interests in the UK we are optimistic that on balance “Trump” will be good for UK economic prospects in the short to medium term if not the world in general.

The final dynamic we believe will impact our world in 2017 is the recent agreement by OPEC and Non-OPEC countries to limit oil production in 2017 and beyond. This has already seen oil prices rise. The UK is an oil producing country and as such this should overall have a positive effect on our economy.

As we look into the next decade the picture is less clear. Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and Robotics (Bots) are set to change the world of employment and by definition the world of recruitment beyond all recognition

It has been described as the “disruptive tidal wave of technology” and you might wish to read our full forecast to help you decide if you are going to be a winner or loser.

 

Top five Sectors for high growth in 2017

 

No. 5 Accounting & Finance

In any economic downturn the demand for accountants and company financial experts rises. That’s my experience and whilst I doubt we will have a recession in 2017, there is no doubt going to be some economic challenges and a shift in corporate dynamics in the next few years to the end of the decade.

Brexit will require large numbers of businesses to make changes to their business and accounting practices. There will be further examination of cost and profit models that businesses operate. This is against the backdrop of rising long term demand for accountants which is caused by the large numbers of baby-boomer accountants retiring from business and more especially in the public sector where there is a small crisis developing.

Finally the other market factor, which is fuelling the rising demand for corporate IPO and finance experts, is caused by the attractiveness of UK businesses to foreign investment. The 15% reduction in the value of the pound post Brexit has suddenly seen a rise in foreign interest in UK companies. The number of mergers and acquisitions are set to rise in 2017 and this will fuel the demand for individuals with corporate finance expertise in this arena.

Ultra Niche Hot Spot predictions

M&A Specialists, Project Managers (Accounting skill-sets), Commercial Accountants, Project/Systems Accountants

 

No. 4 Oil, Gas and Energy

This sector has seen a downturn in the previous years projections but with the UK Government endorsement of the Hinkley Point C and Wylva Nuclear Power Stations projects plus the OPEC agreement with Non-OPEC countries to limit production also seeing an oil price rise there is a renewed confidence in many parts of the industry. The magic number is $70 a barrel above which the major oil exploration companies feel confident to speculate on developing potential fields.

In 2017 we expect the $70 a barrel level to be achieved but even before that we are already seeing some RFIs and tenders coming out by firms speculating on an up turn and looking to take advantage of the excess capacity in the industry and hopefully achieve some good sub-contract rates. With this in mind this we believe there will be a healthy rise in demand for people in this sector during Q3 and Q4 2017.

The significantly ageing workforce in Nuclear is likely to create a major skill-shortage here. Currently whilst demand for staff is high the large MSP contract providers that dominate this market are operating at margins that are almost unsustainable for SME agencies, especially when you factor in the cost of finance. It will be fascinating to see what will give first but as the public sector (education and NHS) have found you can’t buck the market for ever. This market seems ripe for niche recruiters to exploit these large skills gaps but we will have to see if this happens.

Our guess is that towards the end of 2017 we will see the dam burst and rates and margins rise as the fight for critical staff breaks out into all out war in some niche sectors.

 

Ultra Niche Hot Spot predictions

System Design Engineers, (Nuclear and Oil & Gas) Mechanical Design Engineers (Nuclear and Oil & Gas), Electrical Design Engineers (Nuclear and Oil & Gas), Project Managers (Nuclear and Oil & Gas) Systems Control Engineers (Nuclear and Oil & Gas).

 

No. 3 Construction

In 2016 we predicted this sector to rise and many recruitment businesses have seen solid growth this year but sadly not the levels we had all wished for. As we indicated the politics of releasing funds and capital flows to enable the huge growth in house building did not happen.

Sadly we do not see the seismic shift that is required in the financial markets to affect the large growth in private sector house building that is still required without a government policy shift.

Yes the government has committed £5 billion to boost the housing building but there is also the market factor that a huge growth in property completions will see prices stabilise if not fall and turkeys as they say don’t vote for Christmas and property developers and builders don’t vote for price falls either. The signs are encouraging in that there has been a growth in domestic building in Q3 but nowhere near the levels the government needs in order to achieve its target of 200,000 new builds a year..

The sectors skills gaps are well documented. In fact there is a fear that BREXIT will lead to thousands of EU nationals who have been plugging those gaps returning to mainland Europe leaving us under-resourced. It was reported in the Telegraph earlier this year that “Tony Pidgley, the chairman of house builder Berkeley homes has spoken out, warning of Brexit’s impact on construction workers, and pointed out that 50pc of his subcontractors are from Eastern Europe.”

This represents 23pc of workers in London. The article also claims that the construction sector needs to attract 500,000 new recruits in the next five years to plug the skill gap. Failure to achieve this will see house building drop from the 140,000 a year we are currently achieving to 100,000 a year and certainly nowhere the 200,000 a year the government wish to secure.

So agencies if you have the workers and can retain them then you should be able to make good margins in 2017-18

The significant number of infrastructure projects that the government has committed to since BREXIT (including New runway Heathrow, HS2 Phase Two) which were reinforced in the 2016 Autumn Statement, only goes to increase the demand for skills and ensures this will be a healthy sector in 2017.

Inequalities between agencies

What we are seeing however is that agencies that work with traditional generalist operating models (which are not worker centric) are not making the most of these growth opportunities. They are at best achieving 5-10% p.a. growth rates and in some cases less than that, whilst those with modern, ultra-niche models that put the focus on worker relationships are achieving 200-300% growth rates.

Perhaps now is the time to review your models and make that switch to being a Niche Recruiter. This blog might help Niche Vs. Generalist

Ultra Niche Hot Spot predictions

Scaffolders, Ground-Workers, 360 Drivers, Site Managers, Quantity Surveyors also traditional trades.

 

No 2 Engineering

The top two performing sectors are so consistently above the rest that it is hard to choose which represents the greatest growth opportunity. On balance we believe Engineering is in second place slightly behind IT and Technology.

The skills gaps in the engineering sector are massive and well documented. An ageing workforce of baby-boomers leaving between now and 2025 is creating a huge pressure on skills, which with the lack of STEM graduates over the past 10-15 years means the talent pool to replace them is woefully small and undersized.

To help you understand the scale of the problem research suggests that 182,000 additional workers are needed to plug engineering-focused graduate and apprentice positions every year until 2022. This is according to Engineering UK.

That’s over 1m more engineers.

According to Engineering UKCurrently the UK produces only 46,000 engineering graduates each year. There will also be demand for around 69,000 people qualified at advanced apprenticeship or equivalent level each year. Yet only around 27,000 UK apprentices a year currently qualify at the appropriate level.

Yes the numbers studying are growing and salaries are rising but the solution is that in the short term to plug this gap we will continue to import engineers from the rest of the world.

So are we surprised that one of the UK’s most famous engineers, Sir James Dyson, is looking to secure his own future talent pipeline by investing £15m over the next five years to secure his need to double his workforce to 6,000 by 2020 in his new Dyson Institute of Technology.

Ultra Niche Hot Spot predictions

Controls Engineers, ICS/DCS Engineers, HRSG Engineers, Turbine Engineers, Power Commissioning Engineer, HVAC Systems Engineers, Plant Layout Engineers, Civil Project Engineers (Nuclear, Rail), Automotive design Engineers, Signalling Engineers, PLC and Automation Engineers, PowerTrain Engineers.

 

No 1. IT and Technology

This sector has consistently been our number one for three out of the last four years. Our reason for this is simple.

IT and Technology faces all the demographic issues and supply and demand factors that the other sectors are grappling with.

Yes IT and Technology has an ageing workforce, Yes, the insatiable thirst for experts is never ceasing but the greatest impact is the rate of technological change and advance plus the globalisation of demand.

This is not a UK problem or a Western World or US problem it is a global wide problem.

In most markets many executives and business owners have not comprehended the scale or rate of advancement of technology change and how it could make their multi-million pound businesses obsolete overnight!

You have only to look at how disruptive business models that use technology or businesses that fail to keep up can fall from a market leading position to relative obscurity in 3-5 years to understand what is at stake.

Look at Novell Networks, in 1996 they were the provider of the worlds largest networking software by 2000 Windows NT had taken over their market position and Nokia have failed to recapture that since.

Between 1995-2000 Nokia were the worlds largest supplier of mobile phones today where are they ranked? According to WhatTechSays they don’t even make the top 10.

What about Blackberry? 2000-2005 everyone wanted one where are they today?

What about Amazon? Uber? Google? AirBnB? Spotify? Netflix? All of which are the disruptive models of today and considered by many to be “Rising Stars” or even “Cash Cows” if you apply the Boston Matrix.

But where will they be tomorrow?

Who is next to fall from grace?

So we can see how important technology is.

Take Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and robotics. The total effect of these three advances alone is predicted to transform the world of work in the next 5-10 years. Many jobs that rely on the processing of data and simple decision-making are set to become redundant. At the same time the growth in demand for the technologists that will enable this change is set to explode over the next 2-3 years.

In the US the prediction is 6% of all jobs will go. “By 2021 a disruptive tidal wave will begin. Solutions powered by AI/cognitive technology will displace jobs, with the biggest impact felt in transportation, logistics and consumer services,” said Forrester’s Brian Hopkins in a recent US Government report on the issue.

Business Intelligence is already a high growth niche and Data Science is rapidly catching up. The growth in demand for cloud architects and engineers, who will design the infrastructure as a service (IAS) and platform as a service (PAS), are tipped to accelerate rapidly, as is the demand for the developers who will develop the applications. Algorithm experts that support rule based AI is a key skill that is being included in many job specs and you can expect this to grow exponentially over the next 3-5 years.

If you are in IT and Technology recruitment there is a massive opportunity for rapid growth over the next 3-10 years. A terrific MUST READ article is Gartner’s Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017. It not only discusses 2017 trends but the likely longer-term developments.

If you are considering IT and Technology as sector to move into or making further planned growth then this is invaluable source of data and foresight.

As our world is set to be transformed, the jury is still out as to whether there will be a net increase in jobs or a reduction. The scaremongers seem keen to spread fear but are they right? Perhaps if it helps people wake up to the change in reality but history tells us otherwise.

We have been here before in the 19th century before the industrial revolution.

In the Pre-Victorian era, millions of people worked in agriculture. Automation arrived and allowed people to move off the land and into cities heralding in a whole new generation of jobs being created in offices,factories, businesses and retail as the factories made a new range of goods, jobs were created constructing buildings and infrastructure as well as roles in merchandising and the selling the goods that were manufactured.

In the 1960s and 70s we were told that the ‘microprocessor’ and computers was going to make thousands of jobs redundant. In 1982 as a young undergraduate working for ICI Plc. in Runcorn I built a prototype freight forwarding pricing system. The concept was proven and implemented by ICI in 1984 and 100-150 booking clerk jobs were made redundant. In the 1980s this happened in thousands of companies across Britain. Yes those roles were lost forever but thousands of others were created employment in the UK today is nearly 8m higher than in 1985 and the percentage of people of working age in employment at its highest at 75% of the working population.

We are about to enter another period of dynamic change and there are going to be huge winners and losers.

For recruiters there is one key question you should all be looking to answer.

Is this change going to see the jobs in my niche or sector become obsolete by this “disruptive tidal wave of technology” or am I serving an area of growth.

If you are servicing logistics, manufacturing, call centre staff, clerical assistants and distribution workers (drivers) then the answer is likely to be YES.

If your niche is in Product design, Engineering or IT and Technology then you are likely to answer NO but then again within all these sectors there will be some jobs that will disappear and other jobs that are created.

It is hard to identify all the winners and losers in this sector but you might find this article from Robert Half on the Top Ten Technology Jobs for 2017 helpful. Equally this article from earlier this year in the CIO Magazine on 10 Hot IT Job Skills for 2016 may give you a few more pointers.

One thing is sure 2017 is the year to review your market and make changes if necessary.

Ultra Niche Hot Spot predictions

UI/UX Developers & Designers, Business Intelligence Experts, Security/CyberSecurity Experts, Cloud Architects and Integration Experts, Data Scientists, Mobile App Developers, Full Stack Web and Product developers.

 

So these are our predictions for 2017. They are are based upon our hands on experience of working with 30-35 recruitment agencies across all sectors in the past 12 months. With all of them growing at annual rates of over 30%+ per year-on-year and some 200-300%, we believe we are well placed to know he best sectors to work in.

In the short term we still see healthy times ahead for the UK Recruitment Market but as we implied beyond 2022 with Brexit and the advance of technology the future becoming less clear.

You may have a difference of opinion and have experiences, which are not so positive so please contact me, [email protected] and let us know or share your thoughts.

We’d love to hear them.

Top 5 most sought after IT skill-sets right now

For IT recruiters, the pursuit of talent is relentless. It’s a never-ending game of cat and mouse as IT industries are growing whilst supply is drastically limited.

The disparity between high-end tech roles and the talent available to fit these roles is a worry to employers. According to the annual CIO report from global research company Gartner (Taming the Digital Dragon: The 2014 CIO Agenda) “Fifty-one percent of CIOs are concerned that the digital torrent is coming faster than they can cope, and 42% don’t feel they have the right skills and capabilities in place to face this future.”

According to a report from the Recruitment and Employment Confederation, this year alone, we have witnessed the sharpest drop of permanent staff availability for over 16 years. Contract staff has also deteriorated its most acute since 1997.

A recent report by PwC revealed that one in every four UK businesses plan to increase their staffing numbers by 5% over the next year. 20% plan to increase by 8% and one-fifth plan to increase by more than 8%. Jon Andrews, HR consulting leader at PwC, said “With two thirds of UK CEOs planning to hire more people in the next 12 months competition for talent will be intense. People with tech-based skills, such as cloud computing, mobile technology and data analytics, will be in strong demand but this is also the area with the biggest skills shortage.”

More recently, the EU commission has launched a ‘Grand Coalition’ to tackle the impending skills shortages. Digital Agenda Commissioner Neelie Kroes spoke to delegates at the conference in Brussels and said “So we agree that unemployment in Europe is unacceptably high and at the same time unfilled vacancies in ICT are growing. We also acknowledge that our competitiveness as a region is under threat if we’re short of digitally skilled people. We cannot go on this way. Doing nothing is not an option: and that is why we are here today. Not to talk and analyse but to decide, commit and act.” The EU has also predicted that by next year, as many as 900,000 vacancies will be unfilled.

The evidence of the ‘skills shortage’ is overwhelming.

Never has there been a time in history where a demand for IT skills was critically so desperate.

There are many sectors within IT that are suffering due to the shortages. We decided to conduct our own research and interviewed industry experts to determine what they think are the five most sought after skill-sets right now.

speech1 copyThe top of the list is standard developments skills. There has never been a time when skills such as ASP, JAVA, Ruby, Agile and Dot.Net were so much in demand. Although these skills are considered as ‘classic’ – they are highly sought after. The implementation, creation and maintenance of the ‘software release life cycle’ are a long process. And, after release there are updates, bug prevention and fixing to consider; so it is an ongoing operation until the software is replaced or becomes obsolete. With IT, literally exploding in recent years, it’s hardly surprising that the need for developers is so prevalent. According to Managing Director Richard Newton of TeckChek “With the development trend, there are Dot .Net developers who are very, very difficult to source. There are probably three decent jobs for every .Net Developer you will find.”

Secondly, roles within the mobile application sector are growing exponentially an alarming rate. Considering that global Smartphone users now exceed 1.75 billion and nearly 20% of all web traffic in 2013 was on a mobile device, finding talent within this sector is almost becoming a desperate situation.  Operations Director Huw Price and Team Lead Keith Watt from CPS Group said “One of the key demands we’re seeing at the moment is any skills around android and iOS development. A lot of companies are looking to improve their online presence and with mobile technologies. They are trying to either stay ahead of the competition or catch up with the competitors.”

Richard Newton also agreed that a critical shortage that clients were noticing was “Anything to do with Smartphone’s, which is a driver in the market and the emerging technologies of Smartphones and PC based applications.” Clearly the demand for these roles will only increase as more people start to use devices, connectivity becomes more widely spread and there is a higher demand for responsive design skills, such as HTML5 and Python.

Huw and Keith added “Anything around iOS development and general UIX people are in shortage. Because there’s not a huge amount of these guys available on the market, just the cost of hiring these people is pretty expensive and a lot of them are fairly junior.”

“For example, you’ve got someone with two years experience out of university who can command £350 a day on a contract basis because they’ve moved into the right sort of company, working with the latest technology around android and iOS development.”

“As a result, their salary expectations are really being driven up within those spaces. The impact speech2 copyfor the end-client is they have a very small talent pool of candidates. It’s very rare you will find highly qualified people looking for permanent work. Most of them are looking for contract, which doubles their earnings. But, because there’s so few of them, the cost of them just goes up exponentially. If a client needs a project completing and its essential work, they have to pay through-the-nose for these people.”

Thirdly skill-sets around business intelligence are in heightened demand. Big Data technology allows businesses to exploit their data. Business intelligence systems allow for masses of information to be extracted, structured and standardized, transforming how businesses utilise their data. The benefits for organisations are plentiful including savings, income generation and scope for analysis to produce market trends. Huw Price and Keith Watt said speech3 copy“One area is business intelligence: SQL Servers; SSRS, SSAS and the oracle side of things. That’s another area which isn’t a candidate-rich market. Obviously, with companies looking to utilise their data better than they have been in the past, we are noticing that there is a rise in vacancies in those areas and not enough quality staff available in that sort of space.”

Fourthly, networking and infrastructure, such as BYOD, bandwidth group, Cloud, data storage and network capacity security are just a few of the sectors that are struggling. CPS Group said “Looking more at infrastructure, I would say it’s difficult to find storage and platform specialists. Also, anyone with good knowledge of Amazon Web Services, we feel will be a growing technology over the next 12-18 months. It already is, but it’s really accelerating now. The AWS is almost like the M-ware when it first arrived. It’s very cheap. It’s basically a web. You can put any server into the cloud onto an AWS platform, so it’s very much a cheaper solution and something that is very easy to use for the end-client; you can do what you want with it. That’s why it’s growing so much.”

Finally, we believe that project management skills are in massive demand and need to certainly not be overlooked when recruiting in the above IT sectors. You could, hypothetically have the best IT staff there is, but it’s pointless without the talent equipped with the right PM skills to plan and deliver the projects. Phillip Pitt, Head of Business Development at Cooper Lomaz said “Over the past 12 months alone, we have seen a 65% increase in project management roles. Worryingly, there isn’t enough talent out there with the skills to match, making these jobs very difficult to fill.”

The exponential growth of technology in recent years has happened that quickly, resulting in candidates with the necessary skills being somewhat a rare breed. It’s as simple as that. We are currently witnessing a global explosion of jobs in all technological fields which can’t be filled.

IT Recruiters at the ‘fashion end’ of the industry have to constantly adapt due to the invariable advances and developments in their industries. Whatever specific IT field they are recruiting for will undoubtedly witness huge change.  They all are.

Many recruiters and employers may see this as an exciting concept, as the skills of today will be dated in five years; and there will by then be more qualified and skilled candidates as universities open up their potentials and offer degrees that correlate with the demands. But, the truth is that the issue of the IT skills gap won’t ever be solved whilst there are emerging technologies developing faster than the skills can be learned.

For the life of the IT recruiter, they too will be windswept with the technological evolutions. They will have to learn the ins and outs of emerging technologies, which may surpass their understanding, unless they themselves are highly articulate and have a deep grasp of the industries in which they are recruiting.

Recruiters cannot afford to become complacent, even if this current skills gap shows signs of narrowing at any point, as undoubtedly, another skills gap will follow.

Employers and recruiters need to be conscious of the fact that we are in a talent war. The 5 most sought after IT skill-sets right now need to be a major consideration for employers. They need to be forward thinking in their hiring strategy and consider the next influx of talent they will need to prepare for.

*We would like to extend a warm thanks to Richard Newton from TeckChek, Huw Price and Keith Watt from CPS Group and Phillip Pitt from Cooper Lomaz for their contribution in writing this article.

 

Top 5 Recruitment Sectors to be in for next 5-10 years

Top 5 Recruitment Sectors to be in for next 5-10 years

With unemployment typically running at 8-11% across the developed economies of the world it seems bizarre to be talking about skills shortages but that is the reality of the world today.

In last weeks blog ‘Can we win the Global Talent War’ I mentioned the five:

  • Information Technology
  • Engineering
  • Energy, Oil and Gas
  • Healthcare
  • Emerging Technology application

This week I go into detail about why these sectors are the ones to be in.

Information Technology

At CeBIT in Hannover Germany last week, Neelie Kroes told delegate’s that the EUs competitiveness is under threat unless we can fill the gap in the regions IT Skills Shortages. The EU have launched a ‘grand coalition’ to address the regions issues.cebit

 

In addition in last weeks article on the CeBIT event the BBC reported:

The (EU) commission’s own figures suggested that there will be 900,000 vacancies for IT-related roles by 2015. There are currently about 26 million people unemployed across Europe. The number of “digital jobs” – jobs based around IT – is growing by about 100,000 every year, yet the number of skilled IT graduates is failing to keep pace.

IT is the fashion industry of business. Whilst financial practices change slowly and evolve at a gentle pace rather than being abolished, IT in business is obsolete inside five years and the people who design, build and maintain our complex IT architecture find their skills similarly redundant too.

In my 24 years in IT recruitment I was asked many times ‘how should I guarantee my employment? For many years I have responded in the same way, as there is no company that can guarantee continuous employment for all its employees forever.

‘If you wish to remain in employment you must take ownership of your own career and ensure you remain current with all the latest technologies in your core sector.’

IT is constantly changing and consequently it renews itself every 5-10 years.

Likewise so do its workers if they wish to remain employed.

As a result of these shortages many of my agency clients, despite the recession, see an increasing need for their services and all have growing sales lines. I see no end to this for the foreseeable future unless the need by business to adopt the latest technology diminishes radically.

Engineering

Last year a study Jobs and growth: the importance of engineering skills to the economy by the Royal Academy of Engineering found that British industry needs 100,000 new graduates in Science, technology, engineering and mathematics until 2020. In total that’s 830,000 professionals and 450,000 technicians.

They found nuclear new build and automotive manufacture as key areas and are predicting a 15% premium compared to UK averages salaries. Those that follow my ‘Greenshoots’ Newsfeeds and tweets will know that automotive has been a key growth area with Nissan, Land Rover Jaguar, BMW and many others all announcing a growth in jobs. With the HS2 Project due to kick off too, this will create further growth in this sector.

In January Sir James Dyson, the inventor, warned of a deficit of 60,000 engineering graduates this year and argued: “The government must do more to attract the brightest and best into engineering and science so that we can compete internationally. “Twenty-six per cent of engineering graduates do not go into engineering or technical professions,” he told the Radio Times. “More worrying is that 85 per cent of all engineering and science postgraduates in our universities come from outside the UK. Yet nine in 10 leave the UK after they finish their studies.”

Clearly all these reports on the engineering sector are collectively projecting skills gaps well into the 2020’s. This too is a key area to grow in.

Energy, Oil & Gas

In a way Energy, Oil & Gas are a subset of Engineering but need to be considered a sector in their own right. The global economy is demanding increased energy production and this drive is forcing greater and greater demand for the engineers to source, design and build the oil, gas and energy extraction and generating complexes. Besides traditional sectors of oil and gas exploration and production, the quest for renewables seems to be gathering a pace here in the UK.

To put the scale of this into context the Lloyds Banking group recently found that oil and gas firms could create up to 34,000 jobs over the next two years. Stuart

While, area director of Lloyds Bank Commercial Banking north of Scotland, said “The 100 companies we surveyed have committed to creating 5,000 jobs, which, if replicated across the industry, would see tens of thousands of jobs created over the next two years.”

Again if you track my ‘Greenshoots – 1000 new jobs created in North Sea’ news feeds in recent weeks you will see them all littered with Oil, Gas and renewable energy projects that have been announced. Only last week Aker Solutions announced a new contract from BP which will see 500 additional jobs on top of the company’s 1,500 already announced here in the UK.

Healthcare

NHS NursesThe drivers behind the demand for healthcare professionals is our globally aging population which poses considerable threat to the world economy over the next 20 to 50 years.

 

As we reported in this weeks March Greenshoots the Nottingham office of Home Instead Senior Care found this week care is not an attractive profession for many and they have been struggling to recruit 40 care workers company. Nevertheless the demand for skills in this sector is set to boom and there appears no end in sight.

The only issue is can we attract the people to work in this highly demanding sector.

 

Emerging Technology Applications

 

As technology advances the application of this to every business is going to create and generate new jobs and skills for which there is a very small supply base.

It is debateable whether these will be IT or engineering jobs. Certainly there will be many in these sectors but technology and mobile technology particularly is starting to pervade the whole of our lives from in-car systems, to domestic climate control systems to intelligent hi-fi to the whole tablet, smartphone industry, which now enables retailers, suppliers and businesses generally to create totally new ways of delivering services to us.

telehealth-remote-kit-btFrom Tele-health that enables patients to be treated for many illnesses at home to iPhone apps that enable us to purchase things on the move, business is changing and the skills and people required to keep businesses ahead of their competitors are going to be highly sort after.

 

Only recently a Computerworld survey indicated that 60% of IT executives plan to hire app developers in 2013.

I’m sure other vibrant sectors will materialise as we emerge out of our worldwide recession and the skills shortages discussed in my blog Third World War begins Now – Recruitment Agencies Mercenaries or Allies? start to bite.

It defies logic that with Europe facing a skill shortage of 23 million by 2020 and China and incredible 140m by 2030, recruitment agencies will not have a key role to play.

Graduates

If you have children considering university then clearly these are the sectors to go for but Graduates in Cap and Gownwith the average student debt tipped to reach £50,000 by 2015 when the new student fees hit, you can understand why fresh graduates will look globally rather than in the UK when seeking careers.

Personally I remain convinced that UK Plc. does not have this policy right so watch this space.